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HistoryCelebrated

Holidays at the
Maxwell House

The Holidays at Maxwell House are joyous open-house celebrations of Colonial History, Community Spirit and friendship.

 

Please visit us during the Warren Walkabout and other Holiday Events to find out more about the Massasoit Historical Association.

 

There's always something cooking!

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Gallery
Christmas's Past

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Southwest Room from the Hall

2013

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Tin Sconce

Southwest Room

2013

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Chimney Breast

Southwest Room

2013

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Cupboard, Chimney Breast

Southwest Room

2013

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Table

Southwest Room

2013

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Side Table, Southwest Room

2013

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Table

Southwest Room

2013

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Hutch

Kitchen

2013

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Hutch

Kitchen

2013

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Above the Fireplace

Kitchen

2013

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Laura Chaney

Demonstrating the Art of Making a Scherenschnitte Ornament

2013

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Scherenschnitte Tree

Higgins Room

2013

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The Maxwell House at Night

2013

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Paper Chains

Chimney Breast, Higgins Room

2013

The Christmas season at the Maxwell House begins with Warren's Holiday Celebration which starts the day after Thanksgiving. 

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The house opened to receive guests for the town tree lighting at Massasoit Park, corner of Baker and Water Streets. 

How to mark Christmas at The Maxwell House was problematic. We were faced with the knowledge that any observance would be contrary to the customs of Baptist Elder, Samuel Maxwell, and his daughter in law, Joanna, who became a Quaker when she married Edward Chase.

Planners  toyed with the idea of doing nothing to celebrate, as an opportunity for education.  We feared, however, that our guests would feel disappointed rather than educated to visit and find an undecorated house. While this would most likely be an accurate recreation of Christmas in Warren in the 18th century, it lacked festive appeal. We did, however, attempt to keep our decorations simple and made from natural materials.

While the Maxwells would have thought we have taken leave of our senses for the wasteful use of fruit only for decoration, it played a major decorating role at the house both inside and outside.

During the twenty some years we held Christmas Open Houses, we experimented with several ideas for decoration. In planning decorations, we consider not only what the effect will be from the inside looking out, but also from the outside looking in.

Please enjoy more of our favorite Holiday memories.

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Hanging a Gingerbread Wreath

2004

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A Gingerbread Ornament

2004

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Holiday Refreshments

2004

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A Glass Pyr

2004

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Glass Pyr Detail

2004

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A Christmas Pudding

2004

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A Natural Arrangment of Holly

2004

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A Welcoming Arrangement

Adorns the Entry

2004

Southwest Room Decor Detail

2004

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Wreath, Ribbon

& Bough

2004

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From the Inside Out

& the Outside In

2004

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Mistletoe

2004

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Southwest Room

Chimney Breast

2004

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Christmas Cheer

2004

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The Kitchen Mantle

2004

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A Christmas Cupboard

2004

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